It’s Queer Here: Introductory Post + Black Trans Lives Matter

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Hello and Happy Pride Month!

Welcome back to my little space and to the first and introductory post of this mini blog series.

Before I go on to talking about It’s Queer Here, I’ll like to talk a little about the history of Pride month, the Black Lives Matter movement and Black Trans Lives.

Pride Month, which is celebrated yearly in June, is to commemorate the Stonewall riots which took place from 28th June to 3rd July 1969 to fight against discrimination of gay people and in extension other queer folks. Amongst the notable figures in these riots, are two Black women. Marsha P. Johnson, a Black trans woman, drag queen, activist and best friend to Sylvia Rivera, a Latinx trans woman who is another important figure and cofounder of STAR — Street Trans Action Revolutionaries along with Marsha. And also Storme DeLarverie, a Black lesbian, entertainer and activist.

There’s so much that should be said about the women mentioned above, but I’m going to cut straight to the point, which is about Black trans lives.

Trans people are the most vulnerable people in the LGBTQ+ community. They’re the most likely to experience school and workplace discrimination, assault, homelessness and poverty. And even amongst trans folks, Black trans people are even more vulnerable than the rest. The average life expectancy of a Black trans woman is 35. This is chilling, and especially for people who have done so much for this community.

Trans people face discrimination within and outside community, a community they fight for on a regular basis. I’ve talked about the protests going on in my previous post and today I’m mentioning it again. I want us to remember as we protest and advocate for Black lives, for us to remember that Black trans lives ARE Black lives, and Black Trans Lives Matter. This week, two lovely Black trans women, Dominique Fells and Riah Milton, were murdered and it seems everyone is content with being silent about their deaths. Remember trans folks as you remember cis folks.

If you’re part of this community and you’re not advocating for Black lives, then you need to rethink. If you’re a part of this community and you’re not advocating for trans lives, you should know that’s the height of hypocrisy. If you’re a part of this community and you’re not advocating for Black trans lives, you really should be ashamed.

As you go on with your celebration this month, remember to advocate for Black trans folks. Protect, donate, defend. Their lives are every bit as important as ours.


 

Again, welcome to introductory post of It’s Queer Here.

It’s Queer Here is a ten days long mini blog series which will hold from June 14 – June 25th (skipping Juneteenth) to commemorate Pride month. The purpose of this blog series is to centre more often forgotten queer voices, especially those which intersect with other marginalisations and affect their experience of queerness. It’s Queer Here can be seen as reminder, that although these identities less are presented, that they’re still here and they’re still queer. 

Its Queer Here will consist of a range of posts from discussion posts, chats/interviews to recommendation posts. This series will include posts from queer Black, Latinx and disabled/neurodiverse book bloggers who will be talking about our experiences being queer with other identities with intersect.

We do hope you stick around and enjoy this series and listen to our stories.


Till next time,

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3 thoughts on “It’s Queer Here: Introductory Post + Black Trans Lives Matter

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